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About Denmark

Denmark

Denmark

The Kingdom of Denmark, consisting of mainland Denmark, the Faroe Islands, and Greenland, is best remembered by historians for its status as the one-time home of Scandinavia’s Vikings (going as far back as the 8th century AD). The word ‘Denmark’ dates back to the Viking age and is carved on the famous Jelling Stone from around 900 AD.

Since then, Denmark went through political unions with nearby Norway and Sweden, as well as periodic conflicts with them. During the Napoleonic Wars (early 1800s), Denmark asserted a trade policy of neutrality and trade with both France & Britain, which resulted in the Danish-British Gunboat War – a major setback for both Denmark and nearby Norway at that time. Unlike other European countries, which had varying success of territorial expansion in other parts of the world, especially Africa, Denmark only had a few overseas possessions by the time it became a constitutional monarchy in the mid-19th century: Danish Gold Coast (Ghana) (until 1850), Danish India (Tranquebar) (until 1869), and Danish West Indies (until 1917, when they became the U.S. Virgin Islands). With Denmark staying out of World War I, it was occupied by Nazi Germany during World War II. Afterwards, it joined NATO and became a founding member of the European Union (EU) (although it does not use the Euro as its official currency).

These days, Denmark is a growing tourism destination – attracting visitors from nearby countries like Germany, the Netherlands, and its Scandinavian neighbors (Sweden, Norway). With tourism just being over 8% of Denmark’s GDP, the country attracts nearly 9 million visitors a year. The lively historic city of Copenhagen (the nation’s capital) is a major draw for tourists. The maintenance of many medieval-era buildings in Copenhagen and other parts of the country, as well as the fame that Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen earned internationally, and the global popularity that toymaker Lego blocks have long enjoyed among school children, have helped build up Denmark’s image as a “fairytale country”.

The Danish capital is a major draw for tourists. The maintenance of many medieval-era buildings in Copenhagen and other parts of the country, as well as the fame that Danish writer Hans Christian Andersen earned internationally, and the global popularity that toymaker Lego blocks have long enjoyed among school children, have helped build up Denmark’s image as a “fairytale country”.